PROFESSIONALISM: A LOOK WITHIN

Historically we have defined “professionalism” from an educational perspective, i.e. years of education, attainment of certifications, number of qualifications.  This program addresses professionalism in terms of how we look, how we talk and how we treat each other, focusing on professional behavior in the workplace.   Does our appearance, our language, and the way we treat each other reflect the values that brought us into the healthcare profession?  This very inspirational program encourages us to define what professionalism really means and what it looks like in day-to-day behavior.

NURSES CARING FOR NURSING: CHANGING THE CULTURE OF NURSING

Have you ever noticed that we are very good a caring for patients and families, and terrible at caring for each other?  We have numerous and strong “silos” in nursing—specialty silos, generational silos, educational silos, practice setting silos...  And in these silos, we talk about, belittle and complain about anyone who doesn’t “fit,” creating a culture of backbiting and negativity.  This program offers suggestions for breaking down silos, taking better care of each other and improving our culture, offering practical ideas that can be put to use right away.

THERE'S NOTHING I CAN DO ABOUT IT!

I created this program after giving the above 2 and hearing people repeatedly say, “I would love to change things in nursing, but “there’s nothing I can do about it.”  Victim behavior seems so prevalent in organizations today; there are many individuals who, rather than trying to find solutions to challenges and problems, prefer to complain, moan and groan, all of which affect morale, creativity and progress.  This program focuses on how to identify victim behavior, deal with it, and work for a more positive nursing culture.  (This session fits perfectly with either of the two above.)

FACING OUR CURRENT REALITY: THE NEED FOR RADICAL LEADERSHIP

Although no one knows what the healthcare picture will look like in the weeks and months ahead, there are some things we can be sure of: change will be the order of the day, we will have stringent financial targets that must be met, cost and quality will be tied together as never before, interdisciplinary teamwork must become the norm and not a “nice to have,” an intense focus on outcomes will make data analysis imperative, understanding process redesign will be critical, new ethical issues will arise, and managing multiple, complex relationships will be an everyday task. NEVER has strong leadership been more important than it is now. Webster’s dictionary defines “radical” as “extreme, favoring fundamental or extreme change, revolutionary;” that is what we need now--radical, courageous leadership. This program/presentation explores what radical leadership looks like, and more importantly, how to practice it.

INTERPRETING THE INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE'S REPORT ON THE FUTURE OF NURSING: MAKING THIS "REAL" FOR NURSING

In October of 2010, The Institute of Medicine published its report on The Future of Nursing.  It was described by various experts as “transformational,” “bold” and “a report that will courageously and fundamentally change nursing.”  It will only do these things, however, if nurses at all levels change behaviors, practice patterns, and long-standing cultural habits.  Nursing needs to make some changes and we need to make them now.  For the 4 key messages and 8 recommendations to become reality, every nurse needs to understand what they mean for them, and nursing departments need to begin implementing practices and processes in support of report findings.  This presentation describes how nurses can begin to do these very things and make the IOM report “real” for their organizations.